Bridgeport man sentenced to 14 years in federal prison for sex trafficking of a minor

A Bridgeport man was sentenced Monday to 14 years in prison for the sex trafficking of a minor.

Darryl Morris, also known as “King Sincere,” will serve five years of supervised release after his prison term, according to the sentence handed down in New Haven by U.S. District Judge Jeffrey A. Meyer.

Authorities say Morris met a 15-year-old girl who was working as a prostitute in New York in November of 2015. A short time later he brought her to Bridgeport. He advertised her services at the website backpage.com, and she began to see customers at Morris’s residence and giving him the money she received. Morris also drove the minor to other locations in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Washington, D.C., where she saw prostitution customers.

The girl worked as a prostitute for Morris from November 2014 to April 2015, and from November 2015 to May 2016, seeing about 10 customers per day, according to authorities.

Morris engaged in sexual activity with the minor victim, and began beating her a few weeks after she arrived in Bridgeport.

On May 2, 2016, investigators found the minor at a hotel in East Hartford after she contacted her mother, who called police. Morris had recently beaten the girl, who had visible scars and signs of physical abuse. She also had a tattoo on the back of her neck with the name “King Sin” underneath a large barcode.

Morris has been detained since his arrest on August 16, 2016. On May 12, 2017, he pleaded guilty to one count of sex trafficking of a minor.

Judge Meyer ordered Morris to pay the girl $100,000 restitution, “which is a conservative estimate of how much money the minor victim earned in prostitution when she was with Morris, according to the U.S. Attorney’s office for Connecticut.

This matter was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Bridgeport Police, East Hartford Police, Stratford Police and the New York Police Department. The case was prosecuted by assistant U.S. attorneys Sarala V. Nagala and Stephen B. Reynolds.